The Stoplight

The long-awaited stoplights at the corner of Walnut and Fern are hanging from their prospective poles, wrapped in what looks like brown paper bags.  They’ve been hanging for a few days now.  I guess we’re waiting for a big hand to come out of the sky and activate things.  A little while ago there was a truck with a big reel of copper wire but he’s gone.  It’s convenient that there’s a Farmers’ Insurance office at the corner because there are sure to be a few fenderbenders when the lights turn on.  Don’t look up !  Look ahead of you.! 

The backstory is HERE.

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Don’s Latest Con

Having fired the hapless James Comey from the Directorship of the FBI, in the most cowardly way possible, our no-class President is trying to distract you again.  His reasons for firing Comey are bogus , or perhaps the right term is specious. He’s trying to  focus attention away from  the fact, now public,  that he knew for almost three weeks that Mike Flynn was a foreign agent before getting him out of the White House.   Don has bought himself an express ticket to Special Prosecutor Land.  Just don’t let him distract you.

Keep your eye on the ball, folks.  

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Chobani vs Alex Jones-Guess Whose Side I’m On!

The first I ever heard of Chobani was an article somewhere a few years ago about a Turkish immigrant who revived a defunct yogurt factory in upstate New York. Since then Chobani has become the most popular yogurt in the US.  I’m eating a lime Chobani as I type this.  I like the raspberry, too.

Their road to success has taken them from New York to Twin Falls, Idaho, where they have built the largest yogurt plant in the country and have become well-known for championing the rights of their employees and other immigrants. This apparently brought them to the attention of the vile Alex Jones, the genius who brought you  “Sandy Hook Didn’t Happen” and Pizzagate, among other  Breitbart-type fantasies. They are suing him, and hopefully they will prevail.

The whole story is HERE

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GOOD UNION JOBS! Interviews Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday

From the Times-Standard:

“Laborers’  Union Local 324 is looking for Apprentice and Journeyman Laborers.

If you are seeking a challenging career working  in construction and want to earn excellent wage and  fringe benefits: Contact  Larry Proctor at (916) 710-5195 to meet and discuss your skills. Find out how to get started! Cost for qualified candidates to join:

Apprentices: $479       Journeymen: $829

Interviews will be held on Tuesday May 2, Wednesday May 3 and Thursday May 4 at the Eureka Labor Temple,  840 E Street,  Eureka.”

GO FOR IT!   These don’t open up that often.

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Why I Don’t Fly

I like to think of myself as a supporter of the local economy. There is one sector, however, in which I do not participate.  I do not fly.  I haven’t flown regularly since 2009, when I retired.  And I don’t miss it.

I used to fly a lot. Try living in Hawaii and working for the Navy if you want to  rack up airline miles.  For eleven years I was flying a couple of times a month to San Diego or Norfolk or DC.  I developed the invaluable skill of being able to sleep on a plane. Now, I actually can’t NOT sleep on a plane.  I’m usually snoozing before takeoff.

And thank God for that! The Friendly Skies aren’t so friendly any more. Better that you sleep through altercations with unruly passengers who actually expect the plane to take them to where their ticket said.  Better that you not have to see the Delta crew snatching a stroller from a mother traveling with three infants, or hear the horrified reactions of the  passengers. People on airliners these days act exactly how you would expect people or animals to behave without adequate space, or room to move around. Just like the rats they used to show us in college. Cramming people into a 12″ width seat may be legal but it’s not smart. The conditions on the typical airliner wouldn’t meet the standards of the Geneva Convention,  but we volunteer to put up with it, because we’re accustomed  to unrealistic airfares.

I especially don’t understand people who FLY to SFO. By the time you spend an hour getting to the airport, an hour checking in, a couple of hours in the air and circling to land  and an hour getting a rental car, that’s five hours and you’re still at SFO.  If you drove, you’d be checking into your hotel.  Or enjoying yourself.  

I know we’ll hear from Gregg Foster that things are’t that bad;  Gregg and the Fly Humboldt folks do a fine job considering what they have to work with.        

As for myself, except for going to China, or Hawaii or Europe – I still have a couple of bucket-list type trips in me-I will be traveling by car, bus or train.  Did you know that you can get to China without flying?  You have to get to Alaska, then take a freighter to Korea then a couple more boat trips,  but it can be done. Let me know how it goes. 

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The Price of a Popsicle

 

When I was five years old my grandmother lived on 14th Street in Eureka and my aunt lived on F Street nearby. They used to send me down to the C&V Market with a NICKEL- 5¢ -to buy a popsicle.

These days I suppose no one would  let a kid out of their sight long enough to travel several blocks and back, but nothing ever happened to me.  The two owners- Mr Corsetti and Mr Venturini- were always there. (Thanks to the folks on I Remember In Eureka When for helping me with the names.)  I loved getting one of those orange chalky- tasting popsicles.  I’m sure they were full of unhealthy chemicals.

The other day I stopped by again. The first thing I saw was a sizable display of smoking implements. That was kind of jarring, but I don’t know what I expected. It didn’t take long to find the freezer full of ice cream treats, but NO POPSICLES!  “You don’t sell Popsicles?” I asked the nice man behind the counter.   He shook his head, smiling sadly.  “No more”.   I found something that was kind of like a  Creamsicle –  orange on the outside with a gummy white interior.  It lasted all the way to Murphy’s. It cost $1.49.

I’m not sure what point I am trying to make except that a Popsicle in 2017 costs 30 times what it did in 1954. Rob Holmlund from the City has introduced zoning changes to protect the small markets of Eureka, and indeed they deserve protection.  Next time you’re driving out and around, stop off at the C&V, or Pat’s or the Handee Market (or the Harris & K market, or the California Market or the Asian Oriental Foods) and buy a loaf of bread or something. These little stores have served the community well.  Support your local markets!

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